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Bush-Era Whistleblower Claims NSA Wiretapped Obama When He Was Senate Candidate (VIDEO)

This Wednesday, a former intelligence analyst turned whistleblower who exposed the alleged domestic spying program during the George W. Bush era, claimed that the NSA had ordered wiretaps on phones connected to then-Senate candidate Barack Obama in 2004.

Russ Tice appeared on The Boiling Frogs Show and claimed that the intelligence community had ordered surveillance on a wide range of targets, including high-ranking military officials, lawmakers and diplomats.

“Here’s the big one […] this was summer of 2004, one of the papers that I held in my hand was to wiretap a bunch of numbers associated with a 40-something year-old wannabe senator from Illinois,” Tice said. “You wouldn’t happen to know where that guy lives right now would you? It’s a big white house in Washington D.C. That’s who they went after, and that’s the President of the United States right now.”

After his allegations went public in 2005, Tice came forth as the whistleblower in the New York Times report that exposed the Bush Administration’s use of warrantless wiretapping. The report forced Bush to admit that the program was indeed being used on a small number of Americans, but Tice continued to allege that the scale of the program was much larger, reaching millions.

Listen to an excerpt of Tice’s interview in the video below.

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Pingback: Bush-era whistleblower claims Obama was wiretapped when Senate candidate

  2. John

    June 22, 2013 at 3:54 pm

    Oh, but that was OK… they were wiretapping a communist born in Kenya…. don’t you understand that? Ask any Republican…

  3. Joe D

    June 22, 2013 at 9:21 pm

    THe Right will tell you that Bush did it for National Security like a US Sen from a State is a National Risk. I hate to pull a Reagan but look at Star Wars and V for Vendetta shows seizing a free Government over lies like 9/11

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