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Kentucky’s ‘Creation Museum’ in Financial Trouble Due to Declining Attendance (VIDEO)

In a developing story from Kentucky, the Creation Museum is running out of money due to declining attendance, bringing their “Ark Encounter” project to a stand-still because of a lack of funding.

Interestingly, the reason for the slowing traffic seems to be creationism itself, since the main exhibit has literally not changed in 5 years. Most museums’ exhibits change as new discoveries are made, as artifacts travel from other museums to visit, or as adjustments in scientific thinking are made.

Another reason could be the demographic that creationism’s proponents target.

Mark Joseph Stern from Slate.com writes:

A spectacle like the Creation Museum has a pretty limited audience. Sure, 46 percent of Americans profess to believe in creationism, but how many are enthusiastic enough to venture to Kentucky to spend nearly $30 to see a diorama of a little boy palling around with a vegetarian dinosaur? The museum’s target demographic may not be eager to lay down that much money: Belief in creationism correlates to less education, and less education correlates to lower income.

In hopes to draw repeat customers, the museum has added zip-lining and sky bridge courses to their attractions this summer. But when confronted by critics who wonder what the zip-lining and sky bridge attractions have to do with the museum’s message, Mike Zovath, the museums co-founder and vice president, says that the extra activities are irrelevant.

“No matter what exhibit we add, the message stays the same,” Zovath said. “It’s all about God’s word and the authority of God’s word and showing that all of these things, whether it’s bugs, dinosaurs or dragons — it all fits with God’s word.”

In their opening year, the Creation Museum garnered around 400,000 visitors, but that number steadily decreased in the following two years, with just over 254,000 visitors showing up this last year.

Watch WCPO’s Channel 9 report on the Creation Museum in the video below.

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143 Comments

143 Comments

  1. The Truth

    June 26, 2013 at 9:16 am

    Dragons fit within God’s words? Really? Dragons?

    Who are these insane people?

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  3. Chris Lang

    June 26, 2013 at 11:42 am

    That explains the appearance of Creation Museum billboards in the Louisville, Kentucky metro area.

  4. Varuka Salt (@Varuka)

    June 26, 2013 at 3:59 pm

    Sounds like we’re running out of morons. Awesome!

  5. Clifford T Smith

    June 26, 2013 at 5:37 pm

    Well that was a no-brainer. They have shot their wad and have no plausible way forward. When it is eventually mothballed I am sure the lord will still bless all the donors in some mysterious way.

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  7. Michael

    June 26, 2013 at 7:18 pm

    The same people who believe Unicorns fit withing God’s words.

  8. Willard

    June 26, 2013 at 9:32 pm

    They are hoping to get the state funds to keep the biz running. The state has not officially given any money, but has said they will give money to any group that wants to build a religious theme park (so they can give money to the creationists). Secular humanists are working on a plan.

  9. donald

    June 27, 2013 at 12:59 am

    good riddance

  10. anthropologist

    June 27, 2013 at 1:52 pm

    makes sense to me- the museum simply failed to evolve!

  11. gmv

    June 27, 2013 at 2:00 pm

    Actually, the Creation Museum’s attendance numbers have held pretty steady for the past several years, and their revenue as well. This article doesn’t cite any sources for its information except a slate.com article.You can look up the actual IRS 990 forms at guidestar.org to see the numbers for yourself (search for Answers in Genesis). Plus, they have added a number of new exhibits over the past 5 years–several just this summer (besides the zip lines).

  12. Clifford T Smith

    June 27, 2013 at 6:06 pm

    Well that will open a whole can of worms, if the state provides funding for one religious enterprise they will have a hard time denying financial support to other religious enterprises. Seems like a good time to be starting a new fangled religion in the great state of Kentucky!!

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  14. Milton Findley

    June 28, 2013 at 10:11 am

    It is OK, I ain’t going to go anyway.

  15. scottjl

    June 28, 2013 at 1:32 pm

    nah. they’ll just have 6 more babies.

  16. Tom

    June 28, 2013 at 4:57 pm

    Dragons do exist. Really up on your natural science aren’t you?: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Komodo_dragon

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  18. BlazingSquirrel

    June 28, 2013 at 6:20 pm

    Saint George killed a dragon supposedly.

  19. MEP

    June 28, 2013 at 6:29 pm

    Dragons are referenced repeatedly in Revelations (usually as the harbinger of the next big disaster in the chain of disasters in Revelations), and some scholars believe that the Leviathan mentioned in Job is thematically related to the concept of dragons. It’s hard to tell because the original books of the bible were written in several different languages over the course of over a thousand years (the Pentateuch alone being based on almost a dozen different scholarly traditions, most of which were primarily oral and not written).

    It’s all fairy dust and superstition, but yes, there is room for dragons in the bible, just like there is room for a magic boat that held all of the non-aquatic species on Earth for 40 full days. Or how there is room for a loving god to divinely support acts of genocide and mass rape (Deuteronomy Chapter 2). Or how a man’s wife could be turned to salt for momentarily looking the wrong direction (or how it was totally cool for that same guy to hand his daughters over to an angry mob to be raped when he had two angels right there who notionally could’ve done something). Or how an extremely strong man could lose everything just because he had a haircut. Or… I think you get the idea.

  20. Augustus

    June 28, 2013 at 7:25 pm

    Good. A societal cancer is failing.

  21. Don

    June 28, 2013 at 8:01 pm

    Dinosaurs would have eaten any people they came across. Creationism is just he latest christian grift to play on the ignorant believers.

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  24. Tom

    June 29, 2013 at 8:03 pm

    Can I presume that most of the people posting here are as ignorant on creation as you claim Creationists are on evolution? It shows. Hard to dialogue with ignorance.

  25. Clifford T Smith

    June 30, 2013 at 6:09 pm

    Be careful what you presume Tom, you’ll be amazed how many folk where brainwashed as children into believing that that genocidal, baby-killer* God of Abraham, Issac & Jacob was the one true God then later on started reading & seeking and discovering how flimsy and hypocritical the entire premise really was and how it has survived principally as a mechanism to exert control over other people with no rational basis.

    • 1 Samuel 15:3

  26. Ian Dowsett

    July 1, 2013 at 9:19 am

    apparently the chicago bears are actual bears, also

  27. velocirrober

    July 1, 2013 at 5:54 pm

    “…when confronted by critics who wonder what the zip-lining and sky bridge attractions have to do with the museum’s message…” The message is clear: We want your money.

  28. foodcooppres

    July 2, 2013 at 3:02 am

    I’ve been to the museum twice and would love to go again. The grounds have been developed more and a petting zoo added since I was there, plus other shows in the awesome planetarium. Everything is top quality and informative as well as beautiful. I also enjoyed seeing my friend Michael Oard, a meteorologist, featured in two of the videos. I know him to be a credible scientist. Oh, it’s a fantastic place, with plenty of evidence to share with open-minded visitors. And I don’t believe it’s really in financial trouble. I am on the mailing list for AIG and have heard no such thing.

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  30. Phil

    July 8, 2013 at 10:35 pm

    Its a real shame. We are living in difficult times right now. A lot of families are struggling to get by. Perhaps the decline could be due to financial hardship. A couple of my kids have gone in the past. They loved it !! I hope to bring my entire family as soon as I can. I think that some people that commented on here, need to understand that a lot of businesses add either attractions or services to their businesses to boost revenue. There is nothing wrong with it at all. Also, I wonder how many of the critics on here went to the museum. I would hope that those critics would do more research into the world we live. There is a lot more to it than what is taught in high school or colleges. The museum is offering a wonderful ministry and I hope the best for everyone involved.

  31. Matt B

    July 14, 2013 at 9:55 pm

    The dragons thing is one of my fav creation explanations. I have read that humans observed dinosaurs extinction. Apparently the dinosaurs were breathing very hard, and the O2 in the atmosphere was much higher back then. So the dinosaurs had flames shooting out of their nostrils. That is where our fire breathing dragon legend came from, observing dinosaurs last breaths.

  32. vidhan

    July 18, 2013 at 7:49 am

    which idiot is going to fund this museum that was made by taking all false facts that were given in a shitty book

  33. JLC

    August 9, 2013 at 4:10 am

    One can only hope this is true!

  34. foodcooppres

    August 10, 2013 at 2:41 pm

    Apparently some people think they are the only ones with a right to express their viewpoint. Sad. The Creation Museum expresses truths that are not popular with some people, but they have a right to their beliefs, and the museum is top-notch. I am sure this article is false–the museum is not in trouble at all. I hope to go again.

  35. stevenam

    August 16, 2013 at 7:57 pm

    People have a right to their beliefs, of course. The problems arise when they confuse their beliefs with actual facts. They are not the same. Creationism is clearly nonsense, and those who deny facts should keep this silliness away from children who don’t know any better. Adults have an obligation to advance humanity, not move it back to the ignorance of the stone ages.

  36. foodcooppres

    August 16, 2013 at 11:05 pm

    Astonishing, the close-mindedness exhibited in some of these comments. The museum has every right to express its viewpoint, and it does so beautifully and convincingly. I happen to disagree with “facts’ shared at many other museums, but I don’t dispute their right to exist.

  37. Richie Cunningham

    August 17, 2013 at 12:20 pm

    The old testament was written mostly in Hebrew. One very small section of one book of the old testament was Aramaic.

    Dragon was the name used for dinosaur prior to the word ‘dinosaur’ existing.

    The incredibly huge boat that held all the kinds (today we call families, not species) for a year, not 40 days, was capable of doing what God instructed.

    It’s interesting you are alarmed of a woman turning to salt for looking back, disobeying God’s direct order, and you didn’t mention the ultimate punishment for disobeying when Adam and Eve ate the forbidden fruit.

    God did not order or condone Lot to offer his girls to the gay men who were trying to get the two angels from Lot. Note, the gay men didn’t want his daughters.

    Samsons power was from God, not his hair. God told him not to cut his hair. He did anyway and God took his power.

    Notice the pattern of disobedience resulting in consequences.

    Evolutionists like to claim creationists need to learn more about evolution before arguing against it but when I see posts like this, it’s clear that Evolutionists and /or atheists need to learn the details better about what we believe before you try to refute it. Straw men abound!

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  39. TweeBee

    October 28, 2013 at 2:04 am

    Good. This place is a travesty and it makes our country look quite foolish in the eyes of the world. Of course, MANY things about this country make us look foolish these days. Not to mention hated.

  40. John Roche

    October 28, 2013 at 2:09 am

    Jesus, that was a dumb comment. The who;e creationist claptrap is cited on one source with no proof or documentation.

  41. J.t. Alwin

    October 28, 2013 at 2:20 am

    That line was crossed long ago when you all started yelling about having a theory that CANNOT be proved by the scientific method being put into my daughter’s SCIENCE books. Now as far as I’m concerned, you can take the root of your ignorance and jam it where the sun doesn’t shine.

  42. Sammy Wright

    October 28, 2013 at 2:33 am

    isaiah 34:7,unicorns

  43. Randall E. Winn

    October 28, 2013 at 2:49 am

    Oh I support the “right” of anyone to say anything they want; but I reserve the right to mock Creationists mercilessly for being stupid, and also to condemn them for lying to our youth.

    What could be more fair?

  44. Randall E. Winn

    October 28, 2013 at 2:55 am

    @Richie Cunningham ‘s reply is simply incorrect on nearly every point but he *is* correct that the Ark’s size was “incredible” — that is to say, not credible. For one thing, it did not carry enough humans to sustain the number of human parasites known to exist today (…unless, of course, new species of parasites evolved since the Flood) nor could it have held enough fresh water to sustain every population of freshwater fish (if the Flood were saltwater) or of saltwater fish (if the Flood were freshwater) nor could it have transported kangaroos from Asia Minor to Australia or llamas to South America.

    So, yes, “incredible” is the right word.

  45. Olafur Ingi Brandsson

    October 28, 2013 at 2:57 am

    This is hilarious, creationist museum attendance declining due to lack of EVOLUTION….

  46. Z-kun

    October 28, 2013 at 3:05 am

    Never has the phrase “Evolve or die” been more amusingly appropriate….

  47. Robb

    October 28, 2013 at 3:08 am

    You can disagree with a fact, but that doesn’t stop it being a fact. The creation museum is based in fiction.

  48. Greg Roberts

    October 28, 2013 at 3:11 am

    You are as smart as the day is wide.

  49. kevin

    October 28, 2013 at 3:13 am

    And another bout between Religion vs Reality ends with Reality remaining Undefeated. The official record is now 1×10^1 trillion to ZERO.

  50. Greg Roberts

    October 28, 2013 at 3:16 am

    There is a billboard in Charlotte as well. A trip to Kentucky to witness the magic of god is easily trumped by football and malt liquor.

  51. Dottie Miller

    October 28, 2013 at 3:24 am

    Awesome comment!

  52. kris799

    October 28, 2013 at 3:50 am

    The CEO needs to consult with Pat Robertson so he can pray the right way. We all know that will solve everything.

  53. lmartin0219

    October 28, 2013 at 4:03 am

    I find it rather interesting that as a Kentuckian, I do not know a single person who has gone to that museum….not even my Christian friends!! But you do hear about it and it is widely known that they are in financial trouble.

  54. Bigdolla

    October 28, 2013 at 4:12 am

    so even creationist museums are not immune to Darwin’s theory of evolution!
    Awesome! score one more point for science!

  55. Karen Teegarden

    October 28, 2013 at 5:53 am

    If the GOP gets their way and cut SS, Medicare, Medicaid and food stamps, they’re customers won’t be able to afford to go.

  56. bill

    October 28, 2013 at 5:59 am

    This idiot-magnet place is a museum like Church’s Fried Chicken is a church

  57. bill

    October 28, 2013 at 6:03 am

    Well said, Sir

  58. Beartx

    October 28, 2013 at 7:12 am

    Foodcooppres, I agree the museum has every right to express its viewpoint. I am sure that it is lovely. However, that right does not preclude it from criticism from others who exercise their right to an opinion, in this case based on science and scholarship.

  59. DWeb

    October 28, 2013 at 2:50 pm

    So where is the Museum of the Flying Spaghetti Monster?

  60. Bardi

    October 28, 2013 at 3:14 pm

    “The Creation Museum expresses truths …”

    The Creation Museum expresses beliefs ….

    There, fixed it for you.

  61. CK Dester Haven

    October 28, 2013 at 5:00 pm

    Yes, the Museum has very right to exist, and we have every right t point and laugh.

  62. Woody

    October 28, 2013 at 5:31 pm

    It’s not really so astonishing that people want to see this museum closed. It’s a propaganda effort by an organization whose business is spreading false science. Their representations of science are foolish and unfounded. They have programs to reach out to children for the express purpose of teaching them absolute rubbish and to convince them not to believe in real science. No intelligent, unbiased person could possibly believe what these people claim to be true.

  63. Russ Klettke

    October 28, 2013 at 7:09 pm

    The problem is in using the word “museum,” which connotes a repository of something with historical accuracy or artistic merit, often associated with ongoing academic research. If it’s about something from literature (e.g., the Bible), it’s really more of a theme park. If it were about the historical development of the bible itself, detailing the centuries of writing and translations, for example, it could be a museum. But its academic arm and entire presentation would need to be subject to peer review. Judging by the defenders of the Kentucky enterprise, critical review and an evolving understanding of the subject is not what they are interested in.

  64. Regnak

    October 28, 2013 at 8:45 pm

    Indeed, the Creation Museum has every right to express its viewpoint. This was never in doubt or even a contested issue.

    And just as the Museum can express its view, so can others who disagree with that view. Or anything else related to the the Museum’s mission statement, development, and inevitable decline.

  65. Monty

    October 28, 2013 at 11:08 pm

    You think they might evolve and change their….oh….wait.

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  67. Emily B

    October 29, 2013 at 2:04 am

    I’m actually quite offended with the assumption that those who believe in creationism are uneducated. I graduated with a BS in Biology, and am 6 months from finishing a four year doctorate program in a science field. I am happy to profess a strong faith in God and creationism. People always feel that the issue is black and white. I’ve been able to marry both Christian and Secular thoughts on the origins of life. Why must the two be mutually exclusive? I can find truth in both.

  68. Lance Webster

    October 29, 2013 at 9:21 am

    Since hey don’t believe in evolution, I guess they can’t evolve. And if the museum DOES evolve…that is grow, change, improve…then isn’t it disproving itself? Hmmm.

  69. Russ Klettke

    October 29, 2013 at 2:02 pm

    Does your doctoral program allow you to claim humans and dinosaurs walked the earth at the same time?

  70. Gray Hunter

    October 29, 2013 at 6:07 pm

    Perhaps they could work out new exhibits of other creation myths…. like the Hindu one or the Cherokee one or the Native Hawaiian one (It’s really interesting actually) or something like that. I mean then they can point and say “See, these other ones are just ridiculous”….ad NEVER get the irony of it all.

  71. Nettie Wood

    October 31, 2013 at 3:23 am

    For things older than 50,000 years, compounds other than carbon are used. Try some of these:

    argon-argon (Ar-Ar)
    iodine-xenon (I-Xe)
    lanthanum-barium (La-Ba)
    lead-lead (Pb-Pb)
    lutetium-hafnium (Lu-Hf)
    rhenium-osmium (Re-Os)
    uranium-lead-helium (U-Pb-He)
    uranium-uranium (U-U)

  72. Cliff Smith

    November 4, 2013 at 2:36 pm

    Well I guess in your case the description would be more accurately “a lack of education in the pertinent fields of study to make an informed decision regarding the scientific credibility of the notion that the world in less than 10,000 years old and that the creation myth of bronze age middle eastern nomads is the most credible explanation for the flora and fauna past & present on this planet.”

  73. Matti

    November 5, 2013 at 6:08 pm

    As someone who is currently in college and has taken some biology I have to ask this. Have you ever presented your vies on creationism for peer review? If you desire to be taken seriously would you do so? Have you created any experiments using the Scientific Method to test Creationism?

    If you haven’t then why not?

    If you were teaching a biology course at the university level would you teach Creationism as a valid scientific hypothesis? Why or why not?

    If you answer honestly I can promise you I know the answers. If you are as educated as you claim and honest with yourself then you know that creationism is a faith based belief that is directly opposed to fact based science.

    That is why this place is a problem. It calls itself a musem. It claims to be educational. It is a giant lie.

  74. foodcooppres

    November 7, 2013 at 6:55 am

    Dear Matti, I sense some confusion as to what science actually is. Have you created any experiments to test the validity of evolution? When historical science is involved, it is not possible to be certain of what happened scientifically, because the history cannot be repeated. Evolution requires just as much faith as Creationism to believe. Everyone begins with presuppositions. But if I begin with a belief in Creation, I find that the facts fit much better than they do with Evolution. The complexity of nature, of even the “simplest” organisms, shouts a designer and a plan. At the website of Answers in Genesis, and also at the website of Creation Ministries International, you will find thousands of pages of evidence for creation. I challenge you to check it out.

  75. RobertA

    November 11, 2013 at 7:05 pm

    Darwin effect!

  76. Laird Popkin

    November 17, 2013 at 5:41 am

    There’s no assumption that every every single individual who believes in creationism is uneducated. There is, however, a strong correlation between belief in creationism and low levels of education, meaning that people who believe in creationism are much more likely to have low levels of education, and people who believe in evolution are much more likely to have higher levels of education, and that’s well understood over decades of polling. That being said, I’m sure that there are some exceptions, but that doesn’t disprove the general coorelation.

    If you have a BS in Biology, I’d hope that covered statistics, so you should be able to follow the above.

    As for whether there’s a conflict between evolution and religion, I would say that there is not in general – the large majority of Americans are Christians and know that evolution occurs. This isn’t a conflict, because the large majority of American Christians believe that the Bible is a guide to morality, meant to illuminate and guide, and is not a literal historical record of the creation of the Earth in 7 days, with vegetarian dinosaurs existing at the same time as man, people who lived hundreds of years, a fairly small boat carrying all living creatures on the planet, etc. The simpleminded version of Creationism advocated by this “Museum” is not even that popular within Creationist circles, because it is so easily contradicted by observed facts. Creationists who are a bit smarter than the ones running the Museum realize that if they commit to things that are easily disproven, they loose, so they keep their assertions more subtle and harder to either validate or disprove.

  77. George Karpel

    November 17, 2013 at 1:35 pm

    Apparently the older fossil-brained generation is dying off , and even 10 year-olds aren’t buying this brainwashed bs anymore. … so I guess education is the real cure to wipe out dogma.

  78. Peter

    November 24, 2013 at 8:53 pm

    Ignorant on ignorance?

  79. Peter

    November 24, 2013 at 9:00 pm

    I went to the AIG web site and found that they justify young-earth creationism and deny even old-earth creationism with some ridiculous excuse that God would not have built the Garden of Eden on top of all the millions of years of sin engendered by carnivorous dinosaurs eating each other. So they have no scientific evidence for their utter nonsense, just a veiled rationalization that any alternative explanation for how we got hear makes their ridiculous belief system collapse like a house of cards.

  80. Peter

    November 24, 2013 at 9:06 pm

    Creationists claim that T-Rex was a docile vegetarian and that those banana-sized teeth were for crushing nuts or chewing salads or something. Too bad they are extinct or we could put one in a cage with a group of creationists to test out their “theory”.

  81. Peter

    November 24, 2013 at 9:09 pm

    Here, not hear. Oops.

  82. Peter

    November 24, 2013 at 9:12 pm

    And Komodo dragons fly and breathe fire.

  83. Dallas Sowden

    November 26, 2013 at 1:51 am

    this is a fairy tale, a farce. children should not be taught this junk. the Earth is billions of years old, dinosaurs died millions of years ago. The chimpanzee is our evolutionary cousin dating back somewhere about a million years ago.

  84. foodcooppres

    November 26, 2013 at 3:43 am

    There is plenty of scientific evidence for the young-earth creation view, but it is ignored by those with a different presupposition. I challenge you to read some of the articles at answersingenesis.org and also creation.org. I am amazed at the name-calling in these comments. Insults are not facts! The Creation Museum is an amazing place, very high quality and based on true facts, as well as the eternal Word of God. God is real, His Word is true, and it all makes sense when you consider only actual data and not presuppositions.

  85. Dallas Sowden

    November 28, 2013 at 7:11 pm

    all of the evangelical creation stories are based only on faith. main stream protestants are mostly dismissive of these imaginative stories.It is also important to remember that mormons, quakers and seventh day adventists are all fully christian.

  86. heterodoxalstalker

    December 3, 2013 at 4:37 pm

    Truth implies provable results, backed by replicable data. There is no proof of creationism. In fact most of the data flat out debunks it. The misunderstanding comes from people confusing belief with proof. You can believe something all you want, but it doesn’t make it true. Science on the other hand is real even if you don’t believe in it. That is the fundamental difference between evolution and various creationism stories.

  87. heterodoxalstalker

    December 3, 2013 at 4:45 pm

    Education is clearly the cure for creationism. That is why so many of the hard core Christians home school their children (so they wont be exposed to science). But with the internet it is getting harder and harder to keep your children away from reality.

  88. foodcooppres

    December 4, 2013 at 3:29 am

    I have not seen any scientific evidence in favor of evolution as yet. There are plenty of assumptions and reliance on unreliable dating methods, but no “missing links” or incontrovertible evidence. Darwin himself expected the fossil record to include many transitional forms, but as yet, there are none. As for creation, there is the problem of life arising from non-living matter (never happens) and the irreducible complexity of even the “simplest” amoeba, and so on. The amazing natural world leads one to believe there must be a designer. I can’t wrap my brain around a belief this all just happened. And if you refer to “natural laws,” where did they come from? There must be a lawgiver. No, I don’t think education is a cure for creationism. But an open mind might be a cure for evolutionism.

  89. Dallas Sowden

    December 5, 2013 at 2:01 am

    a well rounded science program should be included in every childs education,
    and the true not conjured up fantasy timeline of dinosaur evolution should be taught.

  90. Dallas Sowden

    December 8, 2013 at 10:53 pm

    Intelligent design is nothing but repackaged
    creationism.Based on faith and constant
    sermonizing and evangelical preaching.It is
    not supported by most main stream protestant
    churches.

  91. jim

    December 22, 2013 at 2:34 am

    From a “Christian Diploma Mill” no doubt.

  92. Dallas Sowden

    December 22, 2013 at 6:54 pm

    outside of southern Baptist/evangelical circles of influence the fairy tale of dinosaurs walking with men is scoffed at .

  93. Roy

    January 8, 2014 at 6:37 pm

    By contrast , this side of “The Pond”, The Natural History Museum in London which is devoted to REAL science had 5,021,762 visitors in 2012. In fact looking at their annual figures, more and more people visit there every year.

  94. Paul Yeaton

    January 19, 2014 at 7:48 am

    CRAZY that there is a a museum for something even beyond pseudo-science.

    “Gods teachings this, and jesus’ teachings that……” If you hate science so much, stop using a computer.

  95. Dallas Sowden

    January 19, 2014 at 5:01 pm

    neil Degrasse is an intelligent and thoughtful leader.The dino worshipping museum should embrace his words.

  96. Fred

    January 22, 2014 at 8:18 pm

    Look at it this way – A trip to this fantasy land is likely less expensive than Disney World.

  97. Lebowski

    February 3, 2014 at 7:21 am

    The Creation Museum expresses t̶r̶u̶t̶h̶s̶ lies that are not popular with some people.

    There, fixed it for ya.

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  99. Dallas Sowden

    February 7, 2014 at 2:30 am

    these are not truths, they are fairy tales. not backed up by scholars other than a few hyper religious ones.

  100. George Karpel

    February 7, 2014 at 7:33 pm

    Re : Unicorn ( Latin = Uni cornus / one horn ) Referred to a rhinoceros. Bad translation from the original Greek ( rhino ceros / one horn ) and a further bad translation into the Old English fairy tale about a horse with a magic horn on it’s head.
    Just goes to show how many bad translations happened before the good old King James version was finished. Must be hundreds more mis-translated words, sentences, and concepts there are in what is supposed to be the unchangeable and factual “word”.

  101. George Karpel

    February 7, 2014 at 7:50 pm

    Recent comment by The Ham ( to Bill Nye )
    Q; What would change your mind? ( about creation ) A: ” Nothing”.
    – Neither reason nor logic nor facts have any bearing on his mental state, or belief in the unchanging, fossilized and dogmatic misunderstanding about what the Bible represents. he is the poster boy for what’s wrong with religious fanatics.

  102. Richard b.

    February 13, 2014 at 1:39 pm

    Gee really. Ya think? The turd zoo is not doing so well either.

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  104. C. Sykes

    May 14, 2014 at 12:46 am

    A giant lizard is not a fire breathing dragon. They just call it a dragon because it’s astonishingly LARGE. Or do you think a flying fox is really a fox instead of a bat?

  105. David

    July 17, 2014 at 7:44 pm

    The Creation Museum has twice the annual attendance of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center located on some of the most prime real estate in Cincinnati. You make it sound like attendance is poor at the Kentucky Creation Museum, yet articles defending the money-losing, taxpayer funded, downtown Cincinnati-based Freedom Center cite that it is well above the median national museum annual attendance of 80,000. Why would you waste your time ranting about the attendance and finances of the privately funded Creation Museum when just a few miles away you have a taxpayer-dollar sucking museum?

  106. foodcooppres

    July 21, 2014 at 4:06 am

    Exactly, David. My friend just visited the Creation Museum, and she couldn’t even get into the Planetarium because it was sold out all day long. No, the museum is doing quite well, I’m happy to say. I plan to go there again myself next month. They keep adding new and wonderful attractions.

  107. George

    July 24, 2014 at 9:28 pm

    Most museums do not sustain themselves with attendance income, or taxpayer funds. Their primary source of income is usually private donations from individuals & foundations, or very rich sponsors. ( like the Freedom Center has )

    … Your tax dollars are safe !
    … Don’t blame the IRS for your bigotry.

  108. rodneynoland

    July 31, 2014 at 11:31 pm

    Don’t worry, they’ll make more morons. It’s easy.

  109. David

    August 5, 2014 at 4:55 pm

    George, here I am asking people to back off their attacks on the Creation Museum, a privately funded organization, and you call this bigotry??? George, your tax dollars are safe w/r/t the Creation Museum. On the other hand, over $910,000 of tax-payer dollars went to the Freedom Center last year, not to mention it shares services with the even more heavily tax-payer subsidized Cincinnati Museum.

  110. Zachary Premack

    August 8, 2014 at 5:58 pm

    Don’t kid yourself. The creation museum is a fucking joke.

  111. Jan Stevens

    August 8, 2014 at 6:37 pm

    Does anyone know why God created the Ebola virus?

  112. Agnostic

    August 8, 2014 at 7:55 pm

    Well the Underground Railroad actually exist and is marked in history. The theory of creationism comes from a book written by man, with no evidence to back it up. Why can’t you people believe a higher power developed the universe, but not under what the church teaches you. Remember the dark ages. Do you see the trouble going on in the Middle East. All fighting over religious non sense. We need to start believing in humanity not religion.

  113. Horus Gilgamesh's older brother

    August 8, 2014 at 9:27 pm

    Just shows that stupidity knows no bounds.

  114. Rick Bagnall

    August 8, 2014 at 10:57 pm

    And what do you suppose the advertising budgets of these two museums are? Me, I’m willing to bet the Creation Museum spends a *heck* of a lot more on advertising than the Freedom Center. Furthermore, it sounds to me like the Freedom Center is busy preserving a part of our national heritage, which sounds like a perfectly acceptable use of tax dollars to me.

  115. Rick Bagnall

    August 8, 2014 at 11:13 pm

    The notion of “irreducible complexity” keeps coming up in creationist arguments, but it’s based primarily on a very dubious interpretation of “knock-out” studies. A “knock-out” study is one in which a chunk of DNA is removed from a cell (usually a single-cell organism) and the resulting–usually non-viable–offspring are examined to determine what that chunk of DNA was responsible for building. Creationists will tell you that this is evidence of irreducible complexity which is evidence of a designer.

    Bull. Suppose I hand you a blueprint for a dresser, and you decide for whatever reason to leave the screws out when you build it. Does the resulting failure of the dresser to hold together prove that screws are utterly vital to the design? No. You could have used nails, you could have used glue, you could have used mortise and tenon or dovetail joints… Just because screws are arguably the most efficient fastener doesn’t mean they’re the only possible fastener.

    In like fashion, we look at the proteins that allow the flagellum to rotate. With only a little imagination, we can contemplate them starting out much like cilia, only allowing motion in one plane. A chance mutation allows some out-of-plane motion and suddenly you have a primitive flagellum. Over millions of generations, mutations that make that primitive flagellum more efficient accumulate until you have a modern flagellum. So why do some bacteria still use cilia, you may ask? Because their ancestors didn’t get that chance mutation that allowed the cilia to bend out of plane. Or because *in their environment* flagella are more of a hindrance than a help. Or for any number of other reasons.

  116. D. Shaw

    August 9, 2014 at 10:27 am

    Someone should make a museum of the creation beliefs of various religions.

  117. Kelly

    August 11, 2014 at 2:12 pm

    Who made dragon? You would be insane to say anything other than GOD!

  118. George Karpel

    August 11, 2014 at 6:19 pm

    That building would have to be the size of The Pentagon to fit all those fantasies in !

  119. George Karpel

    August 11, 2014 at 6:21 pm

    If you can show me a real dragon , I will tell you who really made it !

  120. Snake Plissken

    August 17, 2014 at 11:55 pm

    Scientology should come out with a creation museum of their own, so the people who visit this joke can take their kids to learn all about the nonsense of Xenu and the space aliens too.

  121. DS

    August 30, 2014 at 1:46 pm

    And Gandalf killed a balrog.. supposedly.

  122. DS

    August 30, 2014 at 4:15 pm

    Not a great analogy as most churches are idiot-magnets as well.

  123. Waltz

    September 4, 2014 at 10:38 pm

    Dragons were composed of primal mans’ ancestors’ innate fear of their three greatest predators; big cats, repriles, and raptors.

  124. Cupid Reagan

    September 5, 2014 at 7:05 pm

    I want to know why people are so eager to believe this new belief system/interpretation of Earth science when it was never questioned before..? The ignorance isn’t the issue here, so much as the arrogance of this new movement is at hand. These people are basically saying they are smarter and better not only than every scientist before them, but that they are also smarter and better than every interpreter of the Bible before them…you know…including apparently all of the folks that actually wrote the book. I thought that book allowed for enough confusion based on interpretation already. I was sorely mistaken.

  125. don

    October 9, 2014 at 1:43 am

    Keep on slugging down that Kentucky Bourbon and you’ll believe anything!

  126. DYohe

    November 20, 2014 at 11:29 pm

    The debate between creationists and evolutionists is so confusing because the terms being used are not clear. Any conversation has to be held by two or more people using the same language and the same vocabulary. One major source of confusion in the creation-evolution debate is the meaning of the word evolution.

    Creationists do not claim that organisms do not change. There is a big difference between microevolution (change within a species), and macroevolution (change from one species to another). Creationists DO claim that evolution from one species to another is not possible, but we have no issue with evolution within a species. It is a scientific fact that plants and animals adapt to their environment over time. However, no organism has ever been observed to change from one species to a completely new one.

    In order for an organism to change from one species to another over thousands or millions of years, as Darwin’s theory states, intermediate forms would have had to exist. Darwin himself said that “saltations” or sudden leaps from one species to another were not possible. Therefore, many intermediary forms between the two species would have to exist if in fact millions of years elapsed between the ancestor and the modern species. Why, then, does the fossil record not display these transitionary fossils? Yes, people will point to Archaeopteryx, the supposed link between reptiles and birds. I will grant that a few forms have been found in the fossil record. However, a few fossils do not prove the theory that EVERYTHING evolved from a common ancestor. If millions of years worth of small, gradual changes exist, millions of years worth of transitional fossils would also have to exist.

    The term evolution must be defined clearly in order to have a reasonable conversation. I, as a Creationist, do not contradict evolution as long as the definition of evolution is restricted to change within a species. I do, however have a problem with the evolution from one species to another. If the theory of evolution claims to be based on real, observable science, then it must be tested by what is observable. A structure with a couple supports does not a building make. A strong building, like a strong theory, must be solidly founded on what is true. Evolution, like creationism, must be tested by what is observable. The truth cannot be changed based on one’s worldview, and the standard for judging two worldviews cannot be different. If evolutionists want to debunk evolution based on its lack of scientific evidence, they will have to be willing to allow Darwin’s theory to undergo the same trial.

    That’s just a little bit of what I have to say. If you disagree with my premises or my conclusion, please let me know. I would love to have a reasonable conversation with you. Let’s all please stop with the namecalling and ad hominem attacks. Instead, let’s actually talk about what everyone claims to believe in: real, observable science.

  127. DYohe

    November 21, 2014 at 1:36 am

    Oops. Evolutionists want to debunk creationism* (3rd to last line, 2nd to last paragraph).

  128. hypatiab7

    December 13, 2014 at 3:43 am

    The important word is ‘supposedly’. Some people will believe anything – the sillier the better.

    By the way, that is a dash between alt and atheism in my website link.

  129. hypatiab7

    December 13, 2014 at 3:53 am

    Some of whom will ditch their parents’ nonsense religion as soon as they can escape.

  130. hypatiab7

    December 13, 2014 at 4:29 am

    Kentucky has turned down Ham’s request for an 18 million dollar
    tax break because he lied about his reasons. He said that the Arc baloney was for the purpose of tourism and not to promote his religion. That’s two lies, so I guess that means that Ham is no longer a Christian. Ham’s own website revealed that he was a liar.

  131. Ban Bam

    December 14, 2014 at 5:44 pm

    feel sorry for anyone who believes “NOTHING” created “EVERYTHING.” there will be consequences.

  132. foodcooppres

    December 14, 2014 at 5:46 pm

    Right on. The other problem with changing into new species is how that new information can be added to the genes. There is no process that ADDS new genetic material. Mutations normally SUBTRACT or ALTER genes, but can’t provide new ones. Usually mutations are harmful.

  133. Ron Leighton

    December 15, 2014 at 2:19 am

    A sort of natural selection, you might say.

  134. Wendy Hypatia Hansen

    December 25, 2014 at 11:51 pm

    A Møøse once bit my sister

  135. psgm

    February 1, 2015 at 11:57 pm

    If ever a business needs to fail THIS is it! A disgraceful attempt to drag the US back into the bronze age! The ONLY reason dinosaurs are even there is because without them, it would have closed in a week! They make it look like Jurassic park ON PURPOSE!

    Note they didn’t add any extra crosses or alters or pictures of jesus!

    This place is an abomination.

  136. Ban Bam

    February 4, 2015 at 3:18 am

    Praise God for the Creation Museum! Truth is much needed in this godless dying world today. May people walking in darkness see the light!

  137. d sowden

    February 4, 2015 at 11:54 pm

    false, false, dino depiction walking with modern man is based
    on a misinterpretation.It’s a lie

  138. Ban Bam

    February 10, 2015 at 3:18 am

    evidence hurts sinful mans pride doesnt it?

  139. Dallas Sowden

    February 11, 2015 at 2:55 am

    hogwash. sin and salvation is an illusory crutch

  140. Gock Cobbler

    February 27, 2015 at 7:40 am

    You seem rather mentally challenged.

  141. Pingback: Conservative Argues Star Trek Promotes Bestiality

  142. Sandy

    June 8, 2016 at 5:34 am

    Thank you so much for this ariletc, it saved me time!

  143. John T.

    August 13, 2016 at 2:06 pm

    All I see here are vulgar, ad hominem attacks from atheists and evolutionists. Are there any capable of civil debate??

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