New CDC report: Thanks to anti-vaccine hysteria, U.S. measles cases have tripled in 2013

This Thursday, the CDC announced that measles cases in the U.S. have tripled in 2013. The national average is usually about 60 cases a year, whereas in 2013 there have been 175 cases so far.

Three high-profile stories were tied to the outbreak: In March of this year, 58 cases were reported in an Orthodox Jewish community that refused vaccinations; A megachurch in Texas that is known for preaching anti-vaccination views was tied to at least 20 cases; in a Hare Krishna community in North Carolina that was largely unvaccinated, at least 23 cases were reported.

The CDC makes it clear that all the outbreaks are directly related to people choosing not to vaccinate.

In the years before the U.S. vaccination program started in 1963, about 500 people died from measles every year. Tens of thousands more were hospitalized. Today, that number has dropped to almost zero directly as a result of vaccines.

The current wave of anti-vaccine hysteria can be traced back to a single study that appeared in the Lancet medical journal — a study that was outright debunked in the science world.

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In a 2011 issue of BMJ (the British Medical Journal), investigative reporter Brian Deer slammed the infamous Lancet study linking vaccines to autism as fraudulent, pointing out that key facts were distorted to support the autism link.

The 15 year-old study claimed that 8 children developed “regressive autism” after getting a combination of vaccines to prevent mumps and rubella. The study was led by Andrew Wakefield, a British doctor who had his license revoked in May of 2011 as a result of “serious professional misconduct.”

It was well known that Wakefield’s conclusions were questionable from the beginning. But the Lancet study is now widely believed to be the source of what eventually sparked widespread anti-vaccination paranoia — now being blamed for the recurrence of diseases that were once brought under control by the proper vaccinations.

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  1. What the hell does Jenny McCarthy have to do with this article? Did she have anything to do with the bullshit study that was proven wrong or anything to do with measles? Someone explain this to me.

    • Jenny McCarthy led a huge anti-vaccine campaign after her son was diagnosed with autism. She went on several popular news and talk shows (like Larry King and Oprah) to make these claims.

    • It’s stupid, really. They are showing McCarthy because she said vaccinations had given her son autism. She is a poster mom for the anti vaxers. I do not vaccinate, for many reasons. None if my reasons have anything to do with Jenny McCarthy.

    • Jenny McCarthy has an autistic child and came out publically against vaccinations because of the potential link to autism. I’m assuming that’s why they chose her photo as she helped make it high profile with her celebrity status.

    • Jenny McCarthy has been very vocal about recommending that parents NOT vaccinate their children. She is a self-appointed spokes-person on the matter.

    • Jenny McCarthy claims that her son’s autism was due to vaccines and made the rounds of talk shows denouncing vaccinations. She even wrote a book about it.

    • Her son has autism and she was outraged when she heard that there was a link to vaccines and autism. She blames the vaccine and supported the study. She was very vocal in her opinion against vaccines and was on numerous talk shows speaking out trying to tell people to beware. Since then the doctor was discredited for the study…but she seemed to become the face of “no vaccines”.

    • You don’t know? She’s FAMOUS and against vaccinations. So of course, people blindly believe her instead of researching themselves… I mean, no one is going to educate themselves to protect their children. They’ll believe the celebrity. (note: sarcasm.)
      She is also behind fourteenstudiesDOTorg. Lots of research.

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  4. People obviously don’t remember how bad all these diseases were prior to vaccinations. I certainly have never lived through the times when these vaccinations were not available, but I have read enough to know that I don’t want to subject my children to those diseases. I would rather have them vaccinated.

    • My family has had the measles. Their family all had the measles. Everyone was fine. So maybe they weren’t all so bad?

      If there would be more research… or better vaccines.. people wouldn’t be so quick to decline. There is a lot of information on both sides and that’s what makes the information not clear. Have you ever researched all the reasons why people choose not to vaccinate? There have been studies done on that side too. Their are people dying from vaccines. Injured from vaccines. Parents are just trying to do the best they can with the information they have. If we want all parents to start vaccinating, their needs to be better research.

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  7. What Jenny McCarthy ultimately caused is more kids sick and/or dying from non vaccinations. Autism is not really “on the rise” as sooo many outlets of this info like to report. It is just better diagnosed today than it was years ago. There is still nothing to point a finger at and blame, even though we are geared, as humans, to want to do so. What we should be focused on is giving people with autism a chance at life, depending where they are on the spectrum. They get schooling, but once they graduate, they have nothing to do. I saw on OCC there is a couple starting adult education/skill center called Fil-a-need.com or something.

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  9. I have 3 kids. First two got all their shots and both had frequent ear infections and both are on the spectrum. My third did not get her mmr only. Never one ear infection and she is talking and meeting all her milestones for her age. The CDC will never come out and say vaccines are linked to autism.

  10. I don’t pay much attention to the CDC, it’s run by the government. And we all see how much the government has lied.

  11. So basically this is happening because one whining twat refuses to acknowledge that it’s probably her own fucked up genes that caused her son to have autism, and blames vaccines instead?

  12. Look, this has nothing to do with Religion.

    The facts stand that Vaccines are made to stay “fresh” for weeks or months.

    The way Vaccines work is by introducing the cells of a virus or bacteria to your immune system to let it get used to that threat with out causing an infection, via dead or weak strains of that disease.

    The chemicals used to preserve the cells are dangerous to your immune system.

    Formaldehyde and Mercury based chemicals are popular chemicals used to maintain the shelf life of these injections.

    You’re the one making it about politics and religion.