Activism

Over 150,000 protesters flood London’s streets calling on Prime Minister David Cameron to resign

As David Cameron reels from the fallout over the so-called “Panama Papers,” 150,000 anti-austerity protesters took to the streets of London and are calling for the conservative British Prime Minster to resign.

As David Cameron reels from the fallout over the so-called “Panama Papers,” 150,000 anti-austerity protesters took to the streets of London and are calling for the conservative British Prime Minster to resign.

Demonstrators from the activist group People’s Assembly are calling for the end of the country’s recent austerity programs and for Cameron to quit after it was found that he profited from his father’s offshore investment fund.

“I’m so glad to be here to pass on Jeremy Corbyn’s absolute support for this demonstration.,” said Dianne Abbott MP, addressing the crowd. “There couldn’t be a more important movement and demonstration than this one today. “Austerity is a threat to the National Health Service and to our public services. We must unite to defend them.”

Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell, speaking at Trafalgar Square, said that “alongside courage and determination, we need solidarity. The workers united will never be defeated.”

“I think Cameron should go, but I think he should take his party with him. His Government is now bankrupt in terms of political ideas, and bankrupt in terms of what they have done with the economy as well,” McDonnell said. “On every front now we are seeing the Government in disarray — in terms of the economy we are slipping backwards instead of growing.”

The Independent reports that the People’s Assembly made “four demands” during the protest, calling for an end to government spending cuts, the alleged privatization of the NHS, rent controls for housing, and the protection of social housing.

“I’m here because I hate David Cameron. It’s all about the cuts, tax dodging, and the NHS for me. They are ruining people’s jobs and making it impossible for everyone,” probation worker Michaella Hagger said.

The march was also supported by trade unions and activist groups, including the Radical Assembly who organized a “No Jobs” bloc calling for “full automation” of the economy and “an end to the ‘paid work is good for you’ culture.”

Featured image: Rachel Megawhat (Breitbart)

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