Featured

‘Chicken pox party’ anti-vaccination mom: ‘Illness is meant to eliminate the weak’

In a growing movement based in an outright rejection of science, parents across the globe are holding “Chicken Pox Parties” and other play dates to expose their children to deadly diseases which include, measles, mumps and rubella — diseases which are all preventable with vaccines.

In a growing movement based in an outright rejection of science, parents across the globe are holding “Chicken Pox Parties” and other play dates to expose their children to deadly diseases which include, measles, mumps and rubella — diseases which are all preventable with vaccines.

Moms like Hollie Singleton of Brisbane have invited parents to expose their healthy children to kids with full blown chicken pox.

Singleton posted her invitation on Facebook and only canceled her party once her children were no longer contagious. But a growing contingent of parents are arranging the parties privately in Facebook groups and are proudly voicing their beliefs in posts like “How to Prep for a Pox Party” or Singleton’s` rants about the survival of the fittest.

In her diatribes on Facebook, Singelton has made incredibly direct statements showing her disregard for the fact that exposing children to chicken pox is sometimes fatal.

“Truth as I see it is too harsh for most to accept: illness keeps population in control and is meant to eliminate the weak and build a stronger species. I’m not liked for that belief, but it is really how I believe we should be understanding our kind,” Singleton posted. She went on to say that  “…illness keeps population in control and is meant to eliminate the weak and build a stronger species.”

Screen Shot 2015-12-21 at 12.27.44 AM

Hollie Singleton (Facebook)

Her post ends with a small heart to insure that her views naturally are taken in a friendly spirit.

Fueled by celebrities like Jim Carrey and Jenna McCarthy who regularly tweet anti-vaccine propaganda, the movement has devotees on both sides of the Atlantic.

Another mom, Amanda Witt of North Texas, moderates a private Facebook page with over 300 participants who regularly arrange play dates to expose healthy children to deadly viruses. Witt recently complained that one of her friends in Collin County was investigated by Child Protective Services after being bullied online for her anti-vaccine views. The CPS showed up at the woman’s door but refused to comment on the case.

Witt claims, “There hasn’t been any law broken. Chicken pox parties are not considered dangerous.”

But Plano, TX criminal law attorney, Peter Schulte, disagrees.

“If a child is introduced to the chicken pox and gets seriously ill or dies, then the parents could face some criminal liability under the penal code.”

Featured image: Hollie Singleton (Facebook)

41 Comments

41 Comments

  1. Pingback: Stick to baseball, 12/26/15.

  2. Pingback: The Bogosity Podcast » Bogosity Podcast: 2015 Wrap-Up

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

To Top