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One day after declaring war on ISIS, Anonymous kills over 3,800 of their Twitter accounts

The potential for how this data could be utilized is expansive, the most notable being its value to law enforcement agencies and other hackers.

Just one day after declaring war on the Islamic State, hacktivist group Anonymous has taken down over 3,800 Twitter accounts associated with the militant group.

For their #OpParis operation, Anon created a new Twitter account and set up opiceisis.strangled.net – a website open to the public which allows anyone who comes across ISIS social media accounts to search the database and report any extremists.

According to SoftPedia, the website will “index ISIS members based on their real name, location, picture, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube accounts.”

Before the Paris attacks, Anonymous has waged war on ISIS members after the Charlie Hebdo attacks, earlier this year, during operation #OpISIS. That time, the group managed to take down tens of thousands of accounts.

With over 3,800 just on the first day, the group seems more determined this time around to finally put an end to the terrorist group.

Just before the Paris attacks, the Ghost Security Group, another secret hacking posse revealed that they’ve traced Bitcoin wallets holding more than $3 million / €2.8 million back to known ISIS members.

https://twitter.com/opparisofficial/status/666482531588411392

The potential for how this data could be utilized is expansive, the most notable being its value to law enforcement agencies and other hackers.

 

[Update, 11/17/15]:

Anonymous is now declaring that over 5,000 ISIS-related Twitter accounts have been taken down. The hacktivists are calling #OpParis their “biggest operation” yet, adding that more “massive cyber attacks” are still on the way. “War is declared. Get prepared,” said another Anonymous tweet.

Apparently, the Islamic State is taking the Anon campaign seriously, and even posted a tutorial on how not to get hacked:

According to Foreign Policy Magazine, in the last nine months, hacktivists claimed to have dismantled 149 Islamic State-linked websites and flagged roughly 101,000 Twitter accounts and 5,900 propaganda videos.

Featured image via Flickr

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