Scandals

Trump’s National Security Advisor resigns because he was a literal threat to national security

In the wake of bombshell revelations that he misled President Trump and Vice President Pence on the nature of talks he had with Russia’s ambassador back in December, Michael Flynn has resigned his role as National Security Advisor, just weeks into Trump’s presidency.

In the wake of bombshell revelations that he misled President Trump and Vice President Pence on the nature of talks he had with Russia’s ambassador back in December, Michael Flynn has resigned his role as National Security Advisor, just weeks into Trump’s presidency.

Flynn submitted his resignation in a letter Monday, acknowledging that he “inadvertently briefed the vice president-elect and others with incomplete information regarding my phone calls with the Russian ambassador.”

“I am tendering my resignation, honored to have served our nation and the American people in such a distinguished way,” Flynn wrote.

Trump announced Monday that retired general Keith Kellogg will serve as acting national security adviser until a permanent replacement is found. Retired general and former CIA Director David Petraeus (who pleaded guilty to sharing classified information with his girlfriend) is reportedly in the running.

Compounding the revelation that Flynn had misled Trump and Pence, The Washington Post reported that then-acting Attorney General Sally Yates warned the Trump camp that Flynn could be a national security risk (e.g., susceptible to blackmail) based on a transcript of his intercepted call with Russian ambassador Sergei Kislyak. Just over a week after the inauguration, Trump fired Yates when she refused to comply with his travel ban. Additionally, The New York Times reported Monday that the Army was investigating Flynn for taking money from the Russian government during a 2015 trip to Moscow — a possible violation of the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution.

“Now, we in Congress need to know who authorized his actions, permitted them, and continued to let him have access to our most sensitive national security information despite knowing these risks,” Representatives Elijah Cummings of Maryland and John Conyers of Michigan said in a joint statement, according to The Atlantic. “We need to know who else within the White House is a current and ongoing risk to our national security.”

We’ll update this story as it develops.

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