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VIDEO: American Evangelical Christians still see Newtown tragedy as a symptom of secularism

In the wake of the tragic shooting in Newtown a year ago, evangelical personalities, and even a former GOP candidate for president, took to the airwaves and lamented the heart wrenching carnage as a symptom of a godless society.

In the wake of the tragic shooting in Newtown a year ago, evangelical personalities, and even a former GOP candidate for president, took to the airwaves and lamented the heart wrenching carnage as a symptom of a godless society.

Garnering the most attention was former Arkansas governor and Fox News pundit, Mike Huckabee, essentially laying the charge that people who don’t believe in an afterlife are lacking any fear of eternal judgment, making massacres like the one at Sandy Hook a predictable phenomenon.

Many people, both religious and nonreligious, find this kind of rhetoric deplorable. But what’s lost in the ensuing debate is the fact that Huckabee, and others like him, are insinuating that secular people (nearly 40% of Americans) participate in an ideology that views the sadism of mass murder as more of an unpleasant inconvenience rather than an immoral abomination.

Although he was forced to walk back his comments after the resulting uproar, there’s no mistaking Huckabee’s original intended message:

“Should we be so surprised that schools would become a place of carnage? Because we’ve made it a place where we don’t want to talk about eternity, life, what responsibility means, accountability — that we’re not just going to have to be accountable to the police if they catch us, but one day we stand before a holy God in judgment. If we don’t believe that, then we don’t fear that.”  

The fallacy that says nonbelievers are less bound to moral principles than believers has long been a rhetorical weapon of religious fundamentalists from all faiths.

During recent holiday seasons, conservative media voices have made a lot of racket about an encroaching “War on Christmas” waged by God-hating atheists who aim to erase religion from the public sphere. While most disputes about public displays of religiosity have less to do with hate and fear and more to do with issues of Constitutional interpretation, the War on Christmas propaganda serves as an effective diversion from a much more sinister campaign against secularism being waged by the Religious Right.

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9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. Ellen

    December 25, 2012 at 5:53 pm

    This shooting may have happened because there wasn’t enough love and connectedness in the shooter’s family, and not enough outreach to get help. I haven’t read anything that indicates anybody there was trying to live a spiritual life, or maybe knew that is important

  2. Cindy Alspach

    December 26, 2012 at 2:58 am

    Okay, so let me get this straight. We took God out of our schools, so that is why Adam Lanza came there and shot children? By that same logic, who came into the Catholic Church and allowed thousands of priests to molest children while God WAS there?

  3. rosco666Terry

    January 29, 2013 at 1:13 pm

    As long as evangelicals are in the same picture as those they are judging, they will never be able to see the picture clearly.

    Their bias will always distort a true view of the world around them because they are seeing it through a ‘self-important’ filter.

  4. Pingback: End-Times Author Claims That Senators and Members of Congress Are Seeking His Advice

  5. jrumor

    February 4, 2013 at 4:33 pm

    because religion has never hurt anybody.

  6. Claudia Joanne Renshaw

    February 4, 2013 at 5:10 pm

    “Mike Huckabee, essentially laying the charge that people who don’t believe in an afterlife are lacking any fear of eternal judgment, making massacres like the one at Sandy Hook a predictable phenomenon.” Is there any evidence that the recent shootings, or the majority of deaths, are caused by the actions of the “non-believers”? I thought (felt) it was just the opposite; that the believers are the ones who are afraid (of the prophesies) and are behaving irrationally (as if mentally ill).

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  8. howitis

    December 16, 2013 at 9:33 pm

    I’ve been reading and hearing a lot lately about how Christianity, and organized religion in general, is “dying out” in the US, and frankly, I think people like Mike Huckabee are the reason. I walked away from church because I came to the conclusion, based on what I saw and heard there every week, that to be a “christian” is to be a racist, sexist, homophobic, narrow-minded, hard-hearted, mean-spirited, ignorant, fearful, self-righteous, judgmental little prig, and I don’t want to be like that. It appears large swaths of our population feel the same way, especially the younger generations.

    Oh I’ve heard a few people who speak for the “progressive” christian movement say that we must realize that “not all christians are like that.” But, frankly, they are losing the war to those who say otherwise. And unless and until they figure out a way to finally be heard over the loud, endless braying of the fundamentalist bullies on the right, their religion is in serious trouble.

  9. lap camera khong day

    July 12, 2017 at 8:13 pm

    Oh I’ve heard a few people who speak for the “progressive” christian movement say that we must realize that “not all christians are like that.” But, frankly, they are losing the war to those who say otherwise. And unless and until they figure out a way to finally be heard over the loud, endless braying of the fundamentalist bullies on the right, their religion is in serious trouble.

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