Art

Banksy wants you to know that Steve Jobs was the son of a Syrian migrant

World renowned British street artist Banksy revealed a new mural this week that depicts Steve Jobs as a Syrian refugee, referencing the fact that Jobs’s father was a Syrian migrant. The mural popped up in a large refugee camp in Calais, France.

World renowned British street artist Banksy revealed a new mural this week that depicts Steve Jobs as a Syrian refugee, referencing the fact that Jobs’s father was a Syrian migrant. The mural popped up in a large refugee camp in Calais, France.

Banksy’s new work of art shows Steve Jobs carrying a black sack over his shoulder, with the original Apple computer at his side. The famously mysterious artist released a rare statement to accompany his latest piece:

“We’re often led to believe migration is a drain on the country’s resources but Steve Jobs was the son of a Syrian migrant. Apple is the world’s most profitable company, it pays over $7 billion a year in taxes–and it only exists because they allowed in a young man from Homs.”

Jobs’s father, Abdulfattah “John” Jandali. Jandali, was born in Homs, a Syrian city that is currently devastated by the brutal civil war betweem rebel factions, ISIS, and the Assad government. Jandali came to the United States, and soon met Joanne Schieble, the biological mother of the Apple founder. The couple gave their child up for adoption in 1955. Jandali is still alive today, and although they only spoke a handful of times, he said that he was very proud of his son in a 2011 interview shortly after Jobs’s death.

The mural is the latest project by Banksy that comments on the European refugee crisis. Banksy previously unveiled other pieces of graffiti earlier this year, and over the summer opened a refugee-themed “bemusement park” called Dismaland. The park featured installations that displayed bodies laying in rafts, among other disturbing yet thought-provoking themes.

After the park closed in September, Banksy donated leftover materials to an emergency housing project, which now houses an estimated 5,000 refugees.

[Quartz] Featured image via Twitter

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